Posts in emerging markets face serious challenges. They are challenged by low investment, lack of sustained international support and insufficient and ill equipped postal networks. They often lack a postal vision, face insolvency and require high levels of government subsidies.

The postal economics of industrialized countries can’t be applied to emerging markets. These Posts must define their own Universal Service Offering (USO) based on their social needs and the cost to provide the services.

The 12 characteristics of Posts in emerging markets

  • Low mail volumes (1-10 letters per person per year or less);
  • Insufficient number of post offices or networks and service-offerings to achieve economies of scale;
  • High fixed costs;
  • Administrative culture;
  • High international mail volume, little domestic mail and little business-to-consumer mail;
  • Post offices in disrepair;
  • Outdated equipment;
  • Little technology;
  • Insufficient investment;
  • Extensive competition usually brought about by postal liberalization;
  • Core products (stamps, parcels, EMS) do not generate sufficient revenue to cover the operating costs; and
  • Reliance on usually-high, annual government subsidy.

On the other hand, Posts in industrialized countries have:

  • High volumes of letter mail;
  • Low international mail volume when you consider the total;
  • The volume of mail is driven by business-to-consumer mail;
  • High salaries;
  • Extensive network of post offices;
  • Heavily automated;
  • Large economies of scale for home deliveries;
  • Only the sender of mail generally pays.

The UN “List of the 50 Least Developed Countries”

The world´s most impoverished and vulnerable countries or the least developed countries (LDCs) are a group of countries that have been classified by the UN as “least developed” in terms of their low gross national income (GNI), their weak human assets and their high degree of economic vulnerability.

You can review the UN’s list below. You can also obtain general information about your country by clicking on your country name below. It will take you to the CIA World Factbook where there is a page for every country. You will also find a link to your Post’s web page.

By clicking on the web pages of other Posts, you can see how Posts are structurally organized. Many of these Posts have also developed new products and services and lowered their operating costs in an effort to dramatically reduce the very high levels of government subsidies, which are taking scarce resources away from the nations infrastructure and social programs. These Posts are trying to be viable.

List of the UN 50 Least Developed Countries (LDCs) (as of June 2017)
Afghanistan
Angola http://www.correiosdeangola.co.ao
Bangladesh http://www.bangladeshpost.gov.bd/INDEX.ASP
Benin http://www.laposte.bj/index1.php?id_page=1
Bhutan http://www.bhutanpost.bt
Burkina Faso http://www.sonapost.bf
Burundi http://www.poste.bi
Cambodia http://www.mptc.gov.kh
Central African Republic
Chad
Comoros http://www1.lapostecomores.com/?kw=web+portal
Congo, Dem. Rep. of the
Djibouti
Eritrea
Ethiopia http://www.ethiopostal.com
Gambia http://www.gampost.gm
Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Haiti  http://www.laposte.gouv.ht
Kiribati
Lao PDR http://www.laopost.com.la
Lesotho http://lesothopost.org.ls
Liberia http://www.mopt.gov.lr
Madagascar
Malawi http://malawiposts.com
Mali http://www.laposte.ml
Mauritania
Mozambique http://www.correios.co.mz
Myanmar http://www.myanmaposts.net.mm
Nepal http://www.nepalpost.gov.np
Niger http://www.nigerposte.net
Rwanda http://i-posita.rw/spip.php?article1
Sao Tome and Principe
Senegal http://www.laposte.sn/laposte/
Sierra Leone
Solomon Islands  https://www.solomonpost.com.sb
Somalia
South Sudan
Sudan http://sudapost.sd/index.php/en/
Timor-Leste
Togo https://www.laposte.tg
Tuvalu
Uganda http://www.ugapost.co.ug
Tanzania http://www.posta.co.tz
Vanuatu http://www.vanuatupost.vu/index.php/en/home
Yemen http://www.post.ye
Zambia  http://www.zampost.com.zm

 Source: United Nations, Committee for Development Policy Development Policy and Analysis Division Department of Economic and Social Affairs

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